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Apple Valley Solicitation Lawyer | Dakota County Prostitution Attorney

Prostitution / Patronizing

Twin Cities Area Prostitution Lawyer

Prostitution is illegal in Minnesota, whether it is the act of selling sex or buying sex. The law classifies both as criminal activity, and each offense can carry different penalties. To be convicted of an offense, the prosecution must prove every element beyond a reasonable doubt. This can be difficult to do, and in some cases the charges can be reduced or dropped.

If you have been charged with patronizing a prostitute or engaging in prostitution, it is important you act quickly to fight the charges. Although these often are misdemeanor offenses, the long-term consequences of a conviction still could be serious. A skilled prostitution defense attorney can help you protect your reputation.

Apple Valley Solicitation Attorney

Call (952) 431-7758 to schedule a free consultation with experienced Apple Valley prostitution defense lawyer James Blumberg. He understands the sensitivity of your case, and he can work with you discretely to ensure your rights are protected. He can use his experience as a former prosecutor to get the charges reduced or dismissed.

James Blumberg is passionate about helping his clients, no matter the situation. James Blumberg Law represents serves clients throughout Dakota County, including Burnsville, Eagan, Hastings, Inver Grove Heights, Lakeville, Mendota Heights and Rosemount, as well as anywhere in the Twin Cities region, including Hennepin County, Ramsey County and Anoka County.


Information About Prostitution and Patronizing


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Prostitution Charges in Minnesota

According to Minnesota Statute 609.321, prostitution is considered hiring, offering to hire or agreeing to hire another individual to engage in sexual penetration or sexual contact. This essentially would be a patron of prostitution, sometimes called "johns." Patronizing a prostitute often is called “solicitation.”

The law also states that being hired, offering to be hired or agreeing to be hired by another individual to engage in sexual penetration or sexual contact. This would be a prostitute, also called a hooker, working girl or a sex worker.

In these cases, the sexual act does not necessarily have to occur for a person to be charged with the offense. Simply offering to pay for the act or commit the act is enough for the charges. For instance, if a person offers to pay for sex to an undercover cop, he or she still could be charged with the offense.


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Penalties for Patrons

According to Minnesota Statute 609.324, if a patron engages in prostitution with a person 18 years or older, he or she could be charged with a misdemeanor. This also could apply if the person hires, offers to hire or agrees to hire someone 18 years old or older for a sexual act. This could be punishable by a minimum fine of $500.

If a person is charged with offense within two years of a prostitution-related crime, he or she could be charged with a gross misdemeanor. The offender would be required to pay a fine of at least $1,500 and to serve 20 hours of community service work. The court could waive the community service in some instances.

Engaging in prostitution or hiring, offering to hire or agreeing to hire a prostitute 18 years old or older for a sexual act in a public place also would be considered a gross misdemeanor. If convicted, a person would be required to pay a minimum of at least $1,500.

If a court sentences a person to a prostitution charge as a patron, the court can determine if he or she used a vehicle in commission of the crime. If the court finds the person did use the vehicle, the information can be sent to the commissioner of public safety. The data then will be recorded on the person's driving record.

The information generally would be classified as private data, but it would be accessible to law enforcement for various purposes, according to Minnesota law. However, if a person previously had been convicted of certain solicitation and prostitution charges, it could become public data.


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Consequences of Prostitution Charges for Sex Workers

A prostitute could be charged with a misdemeanor offense if he or she engages in prostitution with a person 18 years old or older or if he or she is hired, offers to be hired or agrees to be hired to engage in a sexual act. This could include up to 90 days in jail, a $1,000 fine or both.

If a person is charged with the offense within two years of a previous prostitution charge, he or she could face gross misdemeanor charges. Prostitution in a public place with a person 18 years old older also could be a gross misdemeanor. This is punishable by up to one year in jail, $3,000 in fines or both.


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Prostitution Charges Related to Minors

When a minor is involved in a prostitution-related charge, the penalties are considered much more severe. For instance, engaging in prostitution with a person younger than 13 years old and hiring or offering to hire a person younger than 13 years old for a sexual act could result in up to 20 years in prison, fines up to $40,000 or both.

Engaging in prostitution with a person between ages 13 and 16 could result in up to 10 years in prison, fines up to $20,000 or both. This also could apply if someone hires or offers to hire a person between age 13 and 16 for a sexual act or sexual penetration.

Engaging in prostitution with someone between age 16 and 18 could mean up to five years in prison, up to $10,000 in fines or both. Additionally, hiring or offering to hire someone between age 16 and 18 for a sexual act could mean the same penalties.

Housing an unrelated minor who is engaging in prostitution also could be considered a criminal act in Minnesota. The charge could apply to any person who houses a minor with his or her guardian's consent and knows the minor is engaging in prostitution. This does not include someone related by blood, adoption or marriage. This could mean up to one year in jail, up to $3,000 in fines or both.


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Additional Resources

Breaking Free — Breaking Free is a Minnesota-based non-profit and social justice and social change organization. The organization helps an average of 400 to 500 women and girls each year escape prostitution and sexual exploitation through advocacy, direct services, housing, and education.

National Human Trafficking Resource Center — NHTRC is a hotline and resource center working to provide human trafficking victims with resources necessary to stay safe. The goal is to combat all forms of human trafficking and eradicate modern slavery. Contact the hotline at (888)-373-7888.

HIPS — This is a non-profit organization dedicated to working with people and communities impacted by the sex industry. The group offers crisis peer counseling and support for people who have been involved in or affected by the sex industry. Contact the hotline at 1-800-676-HIPS.


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James Blumberg Law - A Prostitution Defense Lawyer in Dakota County

Contact James Blumberg Law to learn more about your options if you are facing charges for prostitution or patronizing a prostitute. Dakota County prostitution defense attorney James Blumberg can help you discreetly fight the charges and protect your future. As a former prosecutor, he knows what it takes to have your name cleared. Call (952) 431-7758 to schedule a free consultation today.

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James L. Blumberg

Attorney James L. Blumberg

As a former prosecutor in the Dakota County Attorney’s Office, James Blumberg has experience on both sides of the criminal courtroom. He knows how to fight to get charges reduced or dismissed for clients in the Twin Cities area.

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