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Great Bodily Harm Caused by Distribution of Drugs

The War on Drugs in the United States has largely been waged in the interest of public health. Legislators and organizations that support prohibition continually point to the many dangers that are endemic to use of illegal drugs.

In addition underlying charges for possession or sale of a controlled substance, Minnesota state law allows prosecutors to charge alleged offenders for directly or indirectly causing great bodily harm through certain illegal drug activities. A conviction for this additional charge can lead to a much longer prison sentence and even bigger fines.

Lawyer for Great Bodily Harm by Distribution of Drugs in Apple Valley, MN

Have you been charged with causing great bodily harm involving the use of a controlled substance in the Minneapolis St. Paul area? It is in your best interest to immediately contact James Blumberg Law so you can begin exploring your legal options.

James Blumberg is an experienced criminal defense attorney in Apple Valley who represents clients in Lakeville, Eagan, Burnsville, Bloomington, St. Cloud, Minnetonka, and many other nearby communities. He can provide a complete evaluation of your case as soon as you call (952) 431-7758 today to set up a free, confidential consultation.


Overview of Great Bodily Harm Caused by Distribution of Drugs in Minnesota


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Great Bodily Harm Caused by Distribution of Drugs Charges in Dakota County

Minnesota Statute § 609.228 establishes that a person may be charged with this crime if he or she “proximately causes great bodily harm by, directly or indirectly, unlawfully selling, giving away, bartering, delivering, exchanging, distributing, or administering a controlled substance classified in Schedule I or II.” Great bodily harm is defined under Subdivision 8 of Minnesota Statute § 609.02 as “bodily injury which involves a temporary but substantial disfigurement, or which causes a temporary but substantial loss or impairment of the function of any bodily member or organ, or which causes a fracture of any bodily member.”

Essentially, people may be charged with causing great bodily harm by distribution of drugs if they are involved in any activity in which they share a Schedule I or II controlled substance with another party and use of that illegal drug leads to medical care. Great bodily harm by distribution charges are most frequently filed after somebody has overdosed or died following shared drug use, such as when an alleged offender injects a controlled substance into the person who suffered great bodily harm as a result.

Convictions for these charges are punishable by up to 10 years in prison and/or fines of up to $20,000. Minnesota’s schedules of controlled substances are listed under Minnesota Statute § 152.02. Some of the most common Schedule I controlled substances include, but are not limited to:

  • Acetyl fentanyl;
  • Flunitrazepam;
  • Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB);
  • Heroin;
  • Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD);
  • Marijuana; and
  • Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Molly, or Ecstasy).

Schedule II controlled substances include, but are not limited to:

  • Amphetamine;
  • Cocaine;
  • Codeine
  • Hydrocodone;
  • Methadone;
  • Methamphetamine;
  • Morphine
  • Opium; and
  • Oxycodone.

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Apple Valley Crimes Related to Great Bodily Harm Caused by Distribution of Drugs

Great bodily harm by drugs charges are usually accompanied by other underlying offenses. Depending on the specific incident, an alleged offender could also face any of the following charges:

  • Controlled Substance Crime in the First Degree, Minnesota Statute § 152.021;
  • Controlled Substance Crime in the Second Degree, Minnesota Statute § 152.022;
  • Controlled Substance Crime in the Third Degree, Minnesota Statute § 152.023;
  • Controlled Substance Crime in the Fourth Degree, Minnesota Statute § 152.024;
  • Controlled Substance Crime in the Fifth Degree, Minnesota Statute § 152.025;
  • Murder in the First Degree, Minnesota Statute § 609.185;
  • Murder in the Second Degree, Minnesota Statute § 609.19;
  • Murder in the Third Degree, Minnesota Statute § 609.195;
  • Manslaughter in the First Degree, Minnesota Statute § 609.20;
  • Manslaughter in the Second Degree, Minnesota Statute § 609.205;
  • Assault in the First Degree, Minnesota Statute § 609.221;
  • Assault in the Second Degree, Minnesota Statute § 609.222;
  • Assault in the Third Degree, Minnesota Statute § 609.223;
  • Assault in the Fourth Degree, Minnesota Statute § 609.2231;
  • Assault in the Fifth Degree, Minnesota Statute § 609.224;
  • Crime Committed For Benefit Of Gang, Minnesota Statute § 609.229
  • Use Of Drugs To Injure Or Facilitate Crime, Minnesota Statute § 609.235;
  • False Imprisonment, Minnesota Statute § 609.255

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Minnesota Resources for Great Bodily Harm Caused by Distribution of Drugs

S.F. No. 1900 | Administration of Opiate Antagonists — Otherwise known as “Steve’s Law,” the Minnesota Legislature passed and Governor Mark Dayton signed this bill that provides immunity to people who call 911 in good faith to save a life and allows law enforcement and the public to access and administer naloxone to save lives. The bill was named after was named for Steve Rummler, an Eden Prairie man who became addicted to prescription opioids (narcotic painkillers) in 2005 after suffering a back injury in 1996. Rummler turned to heroin when his painkiller prescriptions ran out, and he died on July 1, 2011, from a heroin overdose.

Overdose Awareness and Withdrawal Information — On this section of the website for the outpatient treatment center Minnesota Alternatives, you can find various information relating to opioid overdoses. In addition to facts about overdoses, you can learn about what to do, risks of overdoses, and withdrawal information. The website also discusses hypnotics and stimulants.

Minnesota Alternatives
7766 Northeast Highway 65
Spring Lake Park, MN 55432
(763) 789-4895


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Find a Lawyer for Great Bodily Harm Caused by Distribution of Drugs in Dakota County

If you were arrested in the Twin Cities for any drug-related crime and are also facing charges of great bodily harm caused by distribution of a Schedule I or II controlled substance, you should not say anything to authorities without legal representation. James Blumberg Law aggressively defends clients throughout Ramsey County, Hennepin County, Dakota County, Carver County, Anoka County, Washington County, and Scott County.

Apple Valley criminal defense attorney James Blumberg is a former prosecutor who fights to get the most favorable outcome to criminal cases for residents of and visitors to communities such as Coon Rapids, Eden Prairie, Maple Grove, Plymouth, Woodbury, Blaine, Brooklyn Park, and many others. Call (952) 431-7758 or fill out an online contact form to schedule a completely free initial consultation.


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